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NPSI International Evolving British Object Relations Conference

Eleventh International Evolving British Object Relations Conference
Sponsored by Northwest Psychoanalytic Society and Institute
 

"The Feeling Mind and Lived Experience: Clinical Transformations in Psychoanalysis"

October 28-30, 2016

Pan Pacific Hotel
2125 Terry Avenue
Seattle, WA 98121 

 Mark Solms is best known for his discovery of the forebrain mechanisms of dreaming, and for his integration of psychoanalytic theories and methods with those of modern neuroscience. Born in 1961, he was educated at Pretoria Boys’ School and the University of the Witwatersrand, South Africa.  He emigrated to London in 1988, where he worked academically at University College London (Psychology Department) and clinically at the Royal London Hospital (Neurosurgery Department), while he trained at the Institute of Psychoanalysis.  He returned to South Africa in 2002. Currently he holds the Chair of Neuropsychology at the University of Cape Town and Groote Schuur Hospital (Departments of Psychology and Neurology) and is President of the South African Psychoanalytical Association. He is also currently Research Chair of the International Psychoanalytical Association.

He was awarded Honorary Membership of the New York Psychoanalytic Society in 1998 and the American College of Psychoanalysts in 2004.  Other awards include the George Sarton Medal of the Rijksuniversiteit Gent, Belgium (1996), the Arnold Pfeffer Prize of the New York Psychoanalytic Institute (2008) and the Sigourney Prize of the American Psychoanalytical Association. He will be named Honorary Fellow of the American College of Psychiatrists in 2016. 

He founded the International Neuropsychoanalysis Society in 2000 and was Founding Editor of the journal Neuropsychoanalysis.  He is on the editorial boards of several other major journals.

He has published widely in both neuroscientific and psychoanalytic journals, including Cortex, Neuropsychologia, Trends in Cognitive Science and Behavioral & Brain Sciences. He is also frequently published in general-interest journals, such as Scientific American.  He has published more than 250 articles and book chapters, and 5 books.  His second book, The Neuropsychology of Dreams (1997), was a landmark contribution to the field. His latest book (with Oliver Turnbull) is The Brain and the Inner World  (2002) is a best-seller and has been translated into 12 languages. He is the authorised editor and translator of the forthcoming Revised Standard Edition of the Complete Psychological Works of Sigmund Freud (24 vols), and the Complete Neuroscientific Works of Sigmund Freud (4 vols).

To read Mark's article, The Conscious Id, click here.

 

 

Maxine Anderson trained as a child psychiatrist. In the 1970s, she accessed psychoanalytic training in Seattle and in the late 1980’s, she studied at the British Society of Psychoanalysis in London. 

The experience of significantly varied points of view led to Maxine’s questioning the dogmatism of any one perspective, and how the need for certainty which we all desire can inhibit the mind’s explorations into the unknown as necessary in its quest for discovery and growth.

Recently Maxine has been trying to look closely at the realms of our humanity (as thought-based functioning) and our inhumanity (as the collapse of the space needed for thought). But more currently the realms of intuitive, affective experience as the fount of creative potential and growth has become more apparent, along with how we can become enslaved and even tyrannized by our thought-based positions.

Maxine is a founding member of NPSI, and a training and supervising analyst for NPSI and several other psychoanalytic institutes in the Northwest and Canada, as well as author of several published articles and a forthcoming book, The Wisdom of Lived Experience.

To read excerpts from The Wisdom of Lived Experience, click here.